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Generally speaking, applying Pond Shield is much like painting.  However, as with anything, there are always ways to make a process much more simple than it already is.  The following contains tips and tricks learned while on the job as well as important instructional concepts coupled with pictures in order to better explain anything you might be having difficulty understanding.  We hope this helps you enjoy the process of applying your epoxy coating to your pond.

Wet Film Thickness Gauge

Epoxy Coating

Usually, when asked, most people are not familiar with what a wet film thickness gauge is.  basically a wet film thickness gauge allows you to make sure you are applying Pond Shield at the proper thickness.  While a coating that is too thick will not harm anything, a coating that is too thin runs the risk of failing at some point.  Not to mention, using the gauge is the best way to make sure you are going to get 60 square feet out of each quart and a half kit.

Epoxy Coating

A wet film thickness gauge is nothing more than a small, square piece of plastic with teeth cut into it all the way around the edges.   These teeth are cut to very specific heights which allow you to measure the thickness of your epoxy coating.  You'll want to use the edge that is marked: 8, 10, 12, 16.  These measurements are in mils, not to be confused with millimeters.  You simply stand the gauge on end, as shown in the picture and press it into the coating.  Try and be sure that you are measuring the coating in a fairly smooth area.  Once done, flip the gauge upside down and examine the bottom of the feet.  You should have coating on 8 and 10 but not 12 or 16.  This indicates a 10 mil coating.  Subsequently, the very ends of the gauge will have coating on them as well but disregard that.

Rough vs. Smooth Surfaces

Epoxy Coating

The surface area you apply Pond Shield to should be smooth in order to get the full coverage of each kit.  The best way to explain this is to compare a ready  to coat surface to that of 60-grit sandpaper.  If your surface area resembles 60-grit sandpaper, you should not have a problem obtaining maximum coverage and there will be enough tooth on the surface area for Pond Shield to adhere to.

Epoxy Coating

While rough surfaces can still be coated, you should plan for extra Pond Shield as those uneven surfaces like the exposed aggregate. Shown here, exposed aggregate will use up some of the square footage allotted for your project.  Pond Shield will cover areas like this but in extreme cases you can correct a problem area by applying a bonding agent to your surface area and then a smooth concrete render over than.  Choosing a proper concrete bonding agent is important so that you do not have problems with the render not sticking properly and eventually falling off of your concrete surface.  If the render falls off, any Pond Shield you applied to that render will come off in the process so be sure the render is bonded well.

More Tips and Tricks can be found on Page 2 or Page 3